Principles of Cultural Interpretation

This course serves as an introduction to the MCA program by providing the interpretative framework for the study of media, culture and the arts. An examination of foundational definitions, questions and worldviews are central to this course as is an understanding of a Christian anthropology. There will also be an overview of the prevailing cultural theories currently in use and how they do or do not cohere with a Christian worldview. Students will be given the opportunity to critique culture during the course of the semester.

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: HUM210

Arts and Ideas of the Ancient World

This course is the introduction to the three-course study of the arts and ideas of world cultures required of MCA majors. It utilizes an integrated approach to the study of the humanities with an exploration of architecture, sculpture, painting, literature, music, drama, religion, and philosophy. This course will focus on the ancient world with an examination of the earliest beginnings of cultural production during the prehistoric era up to and include an consideration of the civilizations, cultures, and traditions of the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, Rome, and late antiquity. As well, there is a focus on the non-Western cultures of ancient Asia, Africa, and the Americas. The course will end with a study of the rise of Islam (ca. 661 AD).

Pre-requisite: ENG 110

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: HUM 211

Arts and Ideas of the Medieval and Early Modern World

This course is the second of the three-course study of the arts and ideas of world cultures required of MCA majors. It utilizes an integrated approach to the study of the humanities with an exploration of architecture, sculpture, painting, literature, music, drama, religion, and philosophy. This course in the sequence will focus on the time period beginning with the Middle Ages and include a sturdy of the Renaissance, the Reformation, as well as the cultural periods of the Baroque, Rococo and Neo-classical. As well, there is a focus on the non-Western cultures of Asia, Africa, and the Americas during the same time period. The course will end with an examination of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Era (ca. 1815).

Pre-requisite: HUM211

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: HUM 212

Arts and Ideas of the Modern World

This course is the third of the three-course study of the arts and ideas of world cultures required of MCA majors. It utilizes an integrated approach to the study of the humanities with an exploration of architecture, sculpture, painting, literature, music, drama, religion, and philosophy. This course focuses on the study of the arts and ideas of world cultures from 1815 to 1968. More specifically, movements will include Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, Post-impressionism, Expressionism and the rise of modern art. As well, there is a emphasis on the non-Western cultures of Asia, Africa, and the Americas during the same time period. The course will end with an examination of existentialism and the rise of Pop Art in the early 1960s.

Pre-requisite: HUM212

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: HUM 311

The Post-Modern World

This course will analyze the tension between the postmodern and Christian worldviews. Beginning with a historical overview of the rise of the postmodern mindset, the course will study the growing influence of postmodernity as it has interacted with modernity, through the thinking of Nietzsche, Derrida, Foucault, and others. Throughout the course, questions surrounding foundationalism, metanarratives, and hermeneutics will be addressed. Epistemology will be a particular focus.

Pre-requisite: HUM312 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: HUM310

History of the English Language

This course examines the history of the English language from its Latin-Germanic origins in the 5th century to contemporary usage, with special emphasis on developments in Anglo-Saxon, Middle English, early modern English after the Great Vowel Shift, the Elizabethan and Jacobean eras, and attempts to standardize English in the 18th and 19th centuries, as well as forms of resistance to standardization, including regional dialects and blended languages. The course will also explore poetic forms, the relationship between spoken language and literature, the social and political implications of language developments, and the effects of technology (printing press, radio, Internet, etc.) on linguistic change.

Pre-requisite: ENG110

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: ENG230

Classical Literature

This course surveys the literary heritage of classical Greece and Rome. The course includes but is not limited to works in English translation by Hesiod, Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Lucan, Virgil, Ovid, Tacitus, Seneca, Cicero and Catullus.

Pre-requisite: ENG120

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: LIT 251

Shakespeare

This course introduces students to the full range of Shakespeare’s writing, including the sonnets, the narrative poems, and the plays. The three objectives are: for students to grasp the sheer inventiveness of Shakespeare’s use of language; for students to grasp the psychological density of Shakespeare’s characters; and for students to grasp the theatricality of Shakespeare’s work. Students will be asked to memorize and recite poems and speeches, and participate in dramatic readings.

Pre-requisite: ENG120

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: LIT252

English and American Poetry

This course surveys English and American poetry. The goals are to acquaint students with important poets and poems; to equip students with an understanding of poetic techniques; and to develop students’ capacity to read, interpret, and appreciate poetry.

Pre-requisite: ENG120

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: LIT351

History of Narrative

This course is for students who desire to write fiction. It takes a broad look at the historical development of the novel and short story. Students will read and critique examples of these two literary genres as a means of understanding how narrative works, specifically how these developments can help today’s writer.

Pre-requisite: ENG120

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: ENG254

Capstone Project

All English seniors are required to complete a culminating capstone project. Students will choose to complete a senior project, portfolio, or thesis based on what will best prepare them for their post-graduation goals and objectives. Regardless of their choosing, students work extensively with faculty members to craft final projects that highlight their strengths and talents.

Pre-requisite: Senior Standing

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: MCA451