The King's College
Humanities

Humanities Courses

 

Arts and Ideas of the Ancient World

This course is the introduction to the three-course study of the arts and ideas of world cultures required of MCA majors. It utilizes an integrated approach to the study of the humanities with an exploration of architecture, sculpture, painting, literature, music, drama, religion, and philosophy. This course will focus on the ancient world with an examination of the earliest beginnings of cultural production during the prehistoric era up to and include an consideration of the civilizations, cultures, and traditions of the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, Rome, and late antiquity. As well, there is a focus on the non-Western cultures of ancient Asia, Africa, and the Americas. The course will end with a study of the rise of Islam (ca. 661 AD).

Pre-requisite: ENG110

COURSE CREDIT: 3

COURSE CODE: HUM211

 

Arts and Ideas of the Medieval and Early Modern World

This course is the second of the three-course study of the arts and ideas of world cultures required of MCA majors. It utilizes an integrated approach to the study of the humanities with an exploration of architecture, sculpture, painting, literature, music, drama, religion, and philosophy. This course in the sequence will focus on the time period beginning with the Middle Ages and include a sturdy of the Renaissance, the Reformation, as well as the cultural periods of the Baroque, Rococo and Neo-classical. As well, there is a focus on the non-Western cultures of Asia, Africa, and the Americas during the same time period. The course will end with an examination of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Era (ca. 1815).

Pre-requisite: HUM211 LEC

Course Credit: 3

Course Code: HUM212

 

Arts and Ideas of the Modern World

This course is the third of the three-course study of the arts and ideas of world cultures required of MCA majors. It utilizes an integrated approach to the study of the humanities with an exploration of architecture, sculpture, painting, literature, music, drama, religion, and philosophy. This course focuses on the study of the arts and ideas of world cultures from 1815 to 1968. More specifically, movements will include Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, Post-impressionism, Expressionism and the rise of modern art. As well, there is a emphasis on the non-Western cultures of Asia, Africa, and the Americas during the same time period. The course will end with an examination of existentialism and the rise of Pop Art in the early 1960s.

Pre-requisite: HUM212

COURSE CREDIT: 3

COURSE CODE: HUM311

 

Classical Literature

This course surveys the literary heritage of classical Greece and Rome. The course includes but is not limited to works in English translation by Hesiod, Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Lucan, Virgil, Ovid, Tacitus, Seneca, Cicero and Catullus.

Pre-requisite: ENG120

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: LIT251

 

Shakespeare

This course introduces students to the full range of Shakespeare’s writing, including the sonnets, the narrative poems, and the plays. The three objectives are: for students to grasp the sheer inventiveness of Shakespeare’s use of language; for students to grasp the psychological density of Shakespeare’s characters; and for students to grasp the theatricality of Shakespeare’s work. Students will be asked to memorize and recite poems and speeches, and participate in dramatic readings.

Pre-requisite: ENG120

COURSE CREDIT: 3

COURSE CODE: LIT252

 

Ancient Philosophy

This course explores the development of Western Philosophy from its origins in ancient Greece through the Hellenistic period. Students will be introduced to the methods of philosophy, key philosophical texts, and central philosophical debates. Emphasis will be placed on Plato and Aristotle.

Pre-requisite: PHL110

COURSE CREDIT: 3

COURSE CODE: PHL210

 

Medieval Philosophy

This course explores the development of Western Philosophy from the Hellenistic period to the emergence of the new physics in the early modern period. Students will be encouraged to better understand the methods of philosophy, key philosophical texts, and central philosophical debates. Some emphasis will be placed on Christian thinkers in the period, including Augustine, Anselm, and Aquinas.

Pre-requisite: PHL210 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3

COURSE CODE: PHL212

 

Modern Philosophy

This course explores the major philosophical changes that produced the modern mind, beginning with the fall of the medieval world-view and then concentrating on Descartes, Pascal, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Sartre, and Nietzsche, interacting with their texts from a Socratic and Christian point of view.

Pre-requisite: PHL212 LEC

Equivalent: PHL314 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3

COURSE CODE: PHL214

 

Principles of Biblical Interpretation

As an introduction to principles and methods of Biblical interpretation, students will focus on learning the methodological model for studying and interpreting Biblical literature in the context of New Testament epistolary literature. Students will focus on applying this model to other genres of Biblical literature. Emphasis is given to the development of motivation and aptitude for study and interpretation of the Bible, as well as application to life.

Pre-requisites: REL112 LEC and REL211 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3

COURSE CODE: REL354