Ancient Philosophy

This course explores the development of Western Philosophy from its origins in ancient Greece through the Hellenistic period. Students will be introduced to the methods of philosophy, key philosophical texts, and central philosophical debates. Emphasis will be placed on Plato and Aristotle.

Pre-requisite: PHL110

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: PHL210


Medieval Philosophy

This course explores the development of Western Philosophy from the Hellenistic period to the emergence of the new physics in the early modern period. Students will be encouraged to better understand the methods of philosophy, key philosophical texts, and central philosophical debates. Some emphasis will be placed on Christian thinkers in the period, including Augustine, Anselm, and Aquinas.

Pre-requisite: PHL210 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: PHL212


Modern Philosophy

This course explores the major philosophical changes that produced the modern mind, beginning with the fall of the medieval world-view and then concentrating on Descartes, Pascal, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Sartre, and Nietzsche, interacting with their texts from a Socratic and Christian point of view.

Pre-requisite: PHL212 LEC
Equivalent: PHL314 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: PHL214


Metaphysics

This course explores what sorts of things there are in the world and the relationships between them. Is the world composed of the material building blocks of physical objects, or are there larger objects such as persons and tables? What is required for a person or a table to endure through time? Do some types of objects depend on others for their existence? Readings will be drawn primarily from contemporary philosophy.
Pre-requisite: PHL210 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: PHL375


Epistemology

This class will explore traditional epistemological questions along with a number of “hot topics” in contemporary epistemology, including some recent developments in formal epistemology, with special emphasis on their significance for Christians. Among the questions we will address are the following: What distinguishes knowing from merely believing a truth? Under what conditions is a belief justified, or reasonable, or rational? Should you become less confident in a belief when someone else examines the same evidence but arrives at the opposite conclusion? Upon learning that some of your beliefs would have been different had you been raised in another culture, should you become less confident in those beliefs? How is faith related to evidence, and under what conditions is it rational to have faith? Do suffering and widespread unbelief provide evidence against the existence of God? We will take a historically informed approach to examining these issues, though our focus will be on contemporary philosophical viewpoints.

Pre-requisite: PHL210 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: PHL365


Philosophy of Religion

This course studies philosophical issues surrounding religious belief, with specific attention to Christian belief and commitment. Topics may include the coherence of traditional conceptions of God, the rationality of Christianity, the nature and existence of God, the relationship between divine and human action, and the problem of evil.

Pre-requisite: PHL210 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: PHL371


Plato

This course is an in-depth examination of Plato’s thought. Topics covered will range across ethics, metaphysics, and epistemology. Primary concern will be given to the task of interpreting and understanding Plato as his ideas are presented in his dialogues and letters, but attention will also be given to the cultural context of his time as well as the influence of his thought later in Western history.

Pre-requisite: PHL210 LEC or PHL213 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: PHL363


Topics in Medieval Philosophy

This course is an advanced study of a particular topic in medieval philosophy. The course may examine a particular figure or figures (e.g. Augustine, Aquinas, Anselm, Scotus, Ockham), important works (e.g. Aquinas’ Summa Theologica, Ockham’s Summa Logicae), or a pervasive theme (e.g. the problem of universals, free will and foreknowledge, perfect being theology). May be repeated, provided the topic is different.

Pre-requisite: PHL212 LEC or (PHL210 LEC and permission of instructor)

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: PHL330


Senior Thesis

The Senior Thesis is an opportunity for students to spend a semester conducting research and writing on a topic of their choice approved by a thesis advisor. Students work extensively with faculty members and complete a significant research project in their chosen topic. Thesis advisement depends upon the mutual consent of professor and student.

Pre-requisite: Senior Standing and minimum GPA of 3.6

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: PHL451


Political Economy

This course addresses big questions at the intersection of economics, politics, and ethics, including arguments over classical liberalism, socialism, social democracy, the regulation of markets, the welfare state, economic justice, and the purposes of economic life. Recurring themes include the relationship between the free individual and the community, natural rights vs. utilitarianism, and the workability of different political-economic systems.

Pre-requisite: ECO211 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: ECO 452


Enlightenment and Liberal Democracy

This course explores different questions relating to the theory and practice of liberal democracy. As a modern political system shaped by the Enlightenment, liberal democracy differs from the democracies of the ancient world in affirming various limits to public authority, limits which are typically codified in individual rights. The course considers the foundations of individual rights and different justifications offered for them. It also assesses other goals of liberal democracies and the broader aims of the Enlightenment as a philosophic movement.

Pre-requisite: HIS-212 LEC AND (PHL-213 LEC OR PHL-212 LEC)

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: POL 312


Public Policy

This is an advanced course in American politics. It assesses some large controversies in public policy, matters relating primarily to domestic affairs. The course introduces students to different perspectives on the relevant topics, with a special emphasis on philosophic arguments that can be applied to policy debates. The course includes an overview of ends and means in public life and typically includes units on deception in politics; the purposes of state-sponsored punishment; abortion; the regulation of pornography; and the appropriateness of “paternalistic” policies.

Pre-requisite: ENG120LEC and POL311LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: POL 352


Epistemology and Scripture

This course will examine the biblical text for philosophical content concerning knowledge, truth, and the process by which the bible depicts epistemological confidence (i.e., How can we know that we’re not wrong about something?). It will also explore epistemology since the Enlightenment with an aim at understanding contemporary views of epistemology (e.g., Reformed Epistemology, Naturalized Epistemology, Virtue Epistemology, etc.).

Pre-requisite: REL-112 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: REL 245


Principles of Biblical Interpretation

As an introduction to principles and methods of Biblical interpretation, students will focus on learning the methodological model for studying and interpreting Biblical literature in the context of New Testament epistolary literature. Students will focus on applying this model to other genres of Biblical literature. Emphasis is given to the development of motivation and aptitude for study and interpretation of the Bible, as well as application to life.

Pre-requisites: REL-112 LEC and REL-211 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: REL 354


Systematic Theology

An introduction to the methods of theological formulation and the central doctrines of historic Christianity: revelation, God, creation, anthropology, Christology, redemption, Spirit, church, and last things.

Pre-requisite: REL-112 LEC and REL-211 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3
COURSE CODE: REL 361