Macroeconomics

An introduction to macroeconomics focusing on aggregate economic relationships and measures such as gross domestic product, inflation, unemployment, fiscal and monetary policy, and international trade. Specific economic issues and policy alternatives are discussed and differences among the key schools of economic thought in addressing these issues are highlighted.

Pre-requisite: ECO211 LEC

Course Credit: 3

Course Code: ECO210

 


Ancient Philosophy

This course explores the development of Western Philosophy from its origins in ancient Greece through the Hellenistic period. Students will be introduced to the methods of philosophy, key philosophical texts, and central philosophical debates. Emphasis will be placed on Plato and Aristotle.

Pre-requisite: PHL110

COURSE CREDIT: 3

COURSE CODE: PHL210

 


Medieval Philosophy

This course explores the development of Western Philosophy from the Hellenistic period to the emergence of the new physics in the early modern period. Students will be encouraged to better understand the methods of philosophy, key philosophical texts, and central philosophical debates. Some emphasis will be placed on Christian thinkers in the period, including Augustine, Anselm, and Aquinas.

Pre-requisite: PHL210 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3

COURSE CODE: PHL212

 


Modern Philosophy

This course explores the major philosophical changes that produced the modern mind, beginning with the fall of the medieval world-view and then concentrating on Descartes, Pascal, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Sartre, and Nietzsche, interacting with their texts from a Socratic and Christian point of view.

Pre-requisite: PHL212 LEC

Equivalent: PHL314 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3

COURSE CODE: PHL214

 


Political Economy

This course addresses big questions at the intersection of economics, politics, and ethics, including arguments over classical liberalism, socialism, social democracy, the regulation of markets, the welfare state, economic justice, and the purposes of economic life. Recurring themes include the relationship between the free individual and the community, natural rights vs. utilitarianism, and the workability of different political-economic systems.

Pre-requisite: ECO211 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3

COURSE CODE: ECO452

 


Statistics

The ability to work with statistics and probability is essential for students in economics, business, science, government, and public policy. In this course, students will be introduced to standard concepts and techniques in statistics and probability and trained in their application. Use of statistical software and training in social science methods will be part of this instruction. Topics covered will include: an introduction to descriptive statistics and probability theory; discrete and continuous probability distributions; sampling; estimation and confidence intervals; hypothesis testing; linear models, linear regression, and least squares estimation; chi square testing; and analysis of variance.

Pre-requisites:  MAT155 LEC or MAT170 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3

COURSE CODE: MAT274

 


Principles of Biblical Interpretation

As an introduction to principles and methods of Biblical interpretation, students will focus on learning the methodological model for studying and interpreting Biblical literature in the context of New Testament epistolary literature. Students will focus on applying this model to other genres of Biblical literature. Emphasis is given to the development of motivation and aptitude for study and interpretation of the Bible, as well as application to life.

Pre-requisites: REL112 LEC and REL211 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3

COURSE CODE: REL354

 


Enlightenment and Liberal Democracy

This course explores different questions relating to the theory and practice of liberal democracy. As a modern political system shaped by the Enlightenment, liberal democracy differs from the democracies of the ancient world in affirming various limits to public authority, limits which are typically codified in individual rights. The course considers the foundations of individual rights and different justifications offered for them. It also assesses other goals of liberal democracies and the broader aims of the Enlightenment as a philosophic movement.

Pre-requisite: HIS212 LEC AND (PHL213 LEC OR PHL212 LEC)

COURSE CREDIT: 3

COURSE CODE: POL-312

 


Constitutional Law

This course introduces students to the central concepts, themes, and controversies of American constitutional law.

Students will read judicial opinions in leading cases decided by the Supreme Court of the United States. The course also acquaints students with current scholarly debates about constitutional interpretation, and asks whether some recent and current doctrines in constitutional law may represent significant departures from the nation’s founding principles.

Pre-requisite: POL311 LEC

COURSE CREDIT: 3

COURSE CODE: POL351

 


Senior Thesis

The Senior Thesis is an (optional) opportunity for students to spend a semester conducting research and writing on a topic of their choice approved by a thesis advisor. Students work extensively with faculty members and complete a significant research project in their chosen topic. Thesis advisement depends upon the mutual consent of professor and student. Therefore, students cannot be guaranteed their choice of an advisor.

Pre-requisite: Senior Standing and GPA 3.6

COURSE CREDIT: 3

COURSE CODE: PPE451