Kaitlyn Hasegawa (PPE ’19) Seeks the Kingdom of God at the U.S. State Department

Rising senior Kaitlyn Hasegawa (Politics, Philosophy, and Economics ’19) is spending this summer in Washington, D.C. interning at the U.S. State Department, expanding her knowledge of international relations and business.

Kaitlyn Hasegawa
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Rising senior Kaitlyn Hasegawa (Politics, Philosophy, and Economics ’19) is spending this summer in Washington, D.C. interning at the U.S. State Department, expanding her knowledge of international relations and business. She has previously interned at The Grace and Mercy Foundation and the National Association of Scholars in New York City, and served as treasurer to The King’s Debate Society in her sophomore year. Below, she shares what she’s hoping to glean from her new opportunity in the nation’s capital.

What is your official title at the U.S. State Department?
I will be a Budget and Planning Intern for the Bureau of the Comptroller and Global Financial Services.

How does this internship connect to your career goals?
I’m interested in eventually working for, or even running my own, political risk analysis firm, applying a macro-level understanding of international affairs to better inform businesses and investors. For me, this particular internship is ideal because it straddles the realms of both international affairs and business, providing a chance to learn about and support the United States’ diplomatic initiatives while also building technical skills in financial analysis.

How is your education at The King’s College preparing you to integrate your faith with your work?
The past three years at King’s have been crucial for shaping my view of what ultimately matters. Since my particular course of study ranges from examining economic concepts to analyzing pivotal moments in Western Civilization, I quickly learned that many choices are grounded in good intentions, but they easily go awry. For me, this observation solidified an understanding that what we often value (money, power, etc.) is meaningless if we do not understand our place and purpose in this world. While these “things” can appear valuable from a distance, they simply encourage us into a hamster-wheel mindset if we pursue them for their own sake.

Consequently, my faith plays a crucial role when I consider vocation because, ultimately, what I do in this world only has purpose if it’s serving God’s kingdom. However, God is not and cannot be compartmentalized to the church pulpit. Living and interning in New York City (and in D.C.) has taught me that He can and will work through distinctly Christian and non-Christian organizations. Since this world is His creation, until He returns we are called to reflect His goodness and desire for justice in all that we do.


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