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Fine Artist Nicora Gangi Loans King’s Six Oil Paintings

September 18, 2018 | Rebecca Au-Mullaney

Florida Morning – After Innes, 2009 (oil on board)
Florida Morning – After Innes, 2009 (oil on board)

This July, fine artist Nicora Gangi loaned six paintings to The King’s College for use in the 2018-2019 academic year. Educated at the Hartford Art School, Montclair State College, and Syracuse University, Gangi was a professor of art at Syracuse University for 29 years. Gangi is regularly published in artists’ books on pastel paintings. Her recognitions include the Pastel First Place Award Still Life (2013), the Heliker-LaHotan Foundation Residency Award (2012), and the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Award (2006). This is now the second year that Gangi has loaned art to King’s.

Six oil paintings by Gangi—two oil on canvas, and four oil on board—hang in the executive suite on the fifth floor of The King’s College. Vice President for Student Development Eric Bennett said, “Some see art as ‘nice to have’ while others see it as vital, a crucial aspect of our culture and humanity. For the record, I agree with the latter. And whenever I need a reminder of the significance of art to The King’s College, I have but to walk outside my office and view Nicora Gangi’s work. I’m truly grateful for our friendship with Nicora—her work is a reflection of the good and the beautiful.”

Gangi has lectured regionally and nationally as a visiting artist at universities and artist’s guilds. She is represented by Novado Gallery in Jersey City, N.J., by The Bender Gallery in Asheville, N.C., and by Gangi Studio in New York, N.Y. The Gangi Studio writes that Gangi’s “biblically-inspired narrative is expressed symbolically, inviting the viewer to consider transcendent questions of life and faith. While modernist in many ways, her oils are related aesthetically, and in a broad sense spiritually, to Hudson River artists.”

Gangi writes, “In my pastel works on paper and oil painting, I explore Realism of the natural and human culture evoking a mysterious feeling of light, darkness, space, and even the passage of time. Looking is paramount in the still life assemblages from which I draw. In these lie implicit narratives and deeply symbolic communications humans instinctively seek: hope in the face of death, the possibility of genuine permanence, and the perseverance of meaning in spite of our weakness, brokenness, and failure.”

Spring on Fifth, 2011 (oil on canvas)
Spring on Fifth, 2011 (oil on canvas)